Action packed

For most of us, watching TV means lounging on the couch or reclining in a chair for hours at a time while munching on a favorite snack. When selecting your next movie night flick keep in mind that watching an action movie is worse for your waistline than listening to a talk show, according to new research.

Blueberries better blood pressure

Is there anything the blueberry isn’t good for? This tiny powerhouse was first brought to nutrition fame by the “Blueberry Man,” James Joseph, Ph.D., whose research credits blueberries with the potential to reverse age-related decline in brain function.

Banana Buff Stuff

Bananas beat out the competition: Most North Americans and Europeans consume what is known as the dessert banana, which is eaten fresh and is very sweet. By contrast, the majority of the world population consumes the plantain.

Crazy for Kumquats

Ten tiny kumquats (about 2/3 cup) are loaded with vitamin C, not unlike other citrus fruit. But where kumquats really stand out is in their 48% of daily fiber — dramatically more than other citrus varieties.

Summer road trip snacks

Whether you’re headed to the lake, beach, mountains or city, road trip season is officially here. With warm, sunny weather and kids out of school, summer is the perfect time to visit family and friends, see new sites or explore the great outdoors. While you’re packing the car, don’t forget the snacks. With nutritious food choices just an arm’s reach away, you can avoid energy crashes and keep morale high. Fill up the tank, turn on the tunes and get ready to hit the road with these healthy road trip snacks!

10 a day

Are you eating enough fruits and vegetables? The most likely answer is NO. The CDC estimates adults in the United States put produce on their plates just once or twice per day, a far cry from the 5 to 9 servings most experts recommend. Now, a 2017 study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology finds ten servings per day may be the key for longer life.

Do we need supplements?

Let’s talk about supplements. With the number of pills, powders and potions on the market, it can be tricky to decipher between health and hype. We’ve always promoted whole foods over supplements, and now there’s even more research showing supplements aren’t just unnecessary, they could be downright damaging.

Power to the peel

Many people don’t know of all the scientific brainpower buzzing at the North Carolina Research Campus, where eight universities have joined forces to study fruit and vegetables alongside Dole researchers. Indeed, the Dole Nutrition Lab, led by Dr. Nick Gillitt, has become a font of nutrition knowledge providing leads for future means to help humans take full healthful advantage of Mother Nature’s bounty.

Core issues

As children, many of us grew up with the impression we should avoid eating seeds from fruit and vegetables (e.g., oranges, watermelon, papaya, bell peppers, etc.) on the vague assumption that they were inedible — possibly even toxic. As adults, we carry on this convention by tossing away apple cores or spitting out grape seeds. Well it turns out we’re operating on the adoption of another food myth: Far from being bad for you, fruit and veggie seeds are actually the most nutritious component of the entire plant!

Pineapple for your peepers

When it comes to eye health, vitamin A usually gets most of the credit—but don’t overlook the potential of vitamin C. This antioxidant nutrient can counteract free radicals that damage the eyes and cause cataracts (clouding) in the ocular lens. Pineapple is an excellent source of vitamin C—just one cup of pineapple packs 132% of your daily value of vitamin C, giving this tropical fruit eye-protection potential.