Do we need supplements?

Let’s talk about supplements. With the number of pills, powders and potions on the market, it can be tricky to decipher between health and hype. We’ve always promoted whole foods over supplements, and now there’s even more research showing supplements aren’t just unnecessary, they could be downright damaging.

Power to the peel

Many people don’t know of all the scientific brainpower buzzing at the North Carolina Research Campus, where eight universities have joined forces to study fruit and vegetables alongside Dole researchers. Indeed, the Dole Nutrition Lab, led by Dr. Nick Gillitt, has become a font of nutrition knowledge providing leads for future means to help humans take full healthful advantage of Mother Nature’s bounty.

Core issues

As children, many of us grew up with the impression we should avoid eating seeds from fruit and vegetables (e.g., oranges, watermelon, papaya, bell peppers, etc.) on the vague assumption that they were inedible — possibly even toxic. As adults, we carry on this convention by tossing away apple cores or spitting out grape seeds. Well it turns out we’re operating on the adoption of another food myth: Far from being bad for you, fruit and veggie seeds are actually the most nutritious component of the entire plant!

Pineapple for your peepers

When it comes to eye health, vitamin A usually gets most of the credit—but don’t overlook the potential of vitamin C. This antioxidant nutrient can counteract free radicals that damage the eyes and cause cataracts (clouding) in the ocular lens. Pineapple is an excellent source of vitamin C—just one cup of pineapple packs 132% of your daily value of vitamin C, giving this tropical fruit eye-protection potential.

Don’t drive, get fit

If rush hour traffic isn’t enough to make you reconsider your daily commute, perhaps your waistline will. A 2016 study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology finds the more often you bike or walk to work, the healthier your weight will be.

Awaken your senses!

When was the last time you truly appreciated a meal? Not just how it tasted, but the way it looked, smelled and felt, and even what it sounded like? If these questions seem odd, consider this: Paying more attention to all five senses as you eat helps you enjoy your food more and avoid overeating.

Colon Inflammation Dropped 87%, Basic Research Found

Like other cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, etc.), cabbage contains powerful phytochemicals with possible anti-cancer effects. Now, new research is investigating the potential of such compounds to counter ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease that significantly increases the risk of colon cancer.

Could „E“ be for immunity?

No one likes getting sick. A case of the flu might mean a few days in bed for some, but for others, infection can be fatal. Pneumonia, a lung infection, results in about 1.6 million deaths worldwide each year, and is a particular concern for the older population.