Could spices be good for you?

Spices like turmeric, cinnamon, ginger and cayenne pepper not only make food taste good, they are also known as ‘super spices’. For millennia, natural medicine and Ayurveda teaching have claimed that spices are good for our health. Now, more and more studies are examining their health-promoting effects. Today, we shed some light on spices that could be particularly good for your body.

Could spices be good for you?

Spices like turmeric, cinnamon, ginger and cayenne pepper not only make food taste good, they are also known as ‘super spices’. For millennia, natural medicine and Ayurveda teaching have claimed that spices are good for our health. Now, more and more studies are examining their health-promoting effects. Today, we shed some light on spices that could be particularly good for your body.

Re-interpreted: Caesar Salad with cabbage

Caesar Salad is a well-known and well-loved classic. We like it best when it’s jazzed up with different members of the cabbage family. Cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts tickle the taste buds and give this classic a special kick.

Pineapple for your peepers

When it comes to eye health, vitamin A usually gets most of the credit—but don’t overlook the potential of vitamin C. This antioxidant nutrient can counteract free radicals that damage the eyes and cause cataracts (clouding) in the ocular lens. Pineapple is an excellent source of vitamin C—just one cup of pineapple packs 132% of your daily value of vitamin C, giving this tropical fruit eye-protection potential.

Tips for getting a good night’s sleep

Day after day, we go to work, we look after our families and we do the important things that need to be done. Yet the most important part of the day is actually night-time: in order to be able to start the day with plenty of energy and to do everything we need to do, a relaxing night’s sleep is essential.

Baking with vegetables: beetroot brownies

Small, round and healthy: beetroot is a real super food. Most people eat it in savoury dishes, but it also tastes great in cakes and makes the dough really moist. Our recipe today for healthy beetroot brownies shows how delicious cakes baked with vegetables can be!

Five second rule fallacy

Food dropped on the floor for less than five seconds is safe to eat, right? Wrong. Researchers from Rutgers University put the “Five Second Rule” to the test in a 2016 study published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Results are less than appetizing.